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Thread: Mr. Awesome

  1. #11

    Default Re: Mr. Awesome

    From memory, and I'd happily be corrected if I got it wrong.

    The T-33 significantly improved the control issues. On arrival at Stead, due to system setup/fingers in the cockpit the tailwheel did not come down, and the tower let Neil know. He elected to do another circuit to try and get it sorted out. Unknown to him, a bullet was lodged in the oil cooler and came out at this time (The hangar had been shot-up by somebody, they found all the bullets but one. The side panels were off the airplane so it wasn't like looking for a bullet hole in the skin....) The oil pressure went away with the oil and the airplane didn't make the runway.

    I was planning on putting T-33 tail feathers on my Yak project until kids came along and changed life plans, now it belongs to someone else.

    Mark

  2. #12

    Default Re: Mr. Awesome

    Mr. Awesome was before my time, but from what I had read and heard (from that video of Skip Holm on youtube talking about flying it) I had always written it off as how to not make an airplane. It's kind of nice to know they eventually got it fixed.

    Probably could have used contra-rotating props to help with the torque.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Seattle, Washington
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    1,775

    Default Re: Mr. Awesome

    Quote Originally Posted by FlyKidChris View Post
    Please correct me if I'm wrong, but for the accident flight, one of the main gear wasn't coming down as well. It appeared to me (so, speculation on my part) that Neil Anderson was trying to cycle the gear to get both mains down, but began to run out of runway before that happened.
    They had modified it so the main gear had inner clamshell doors (as a stock Yak doesn't have any). Perestroika/Czech Mate has a mechanical system on its clamshells that when the tire retracts it closes the doors. On Mr. Awesome, there were two separate gear handles. You had to raise the gear then close the clamshells...two separate actions. And it was the reverse on landing, you had to open the clamshells and then lower the gear.

    In the heat of the emergency, Neil forgot to open the clamshells and lowered the gear, so the mains were trying to punch through the inner doors. One came down, the other hung up. That was why it went off the runway and cartwheeled.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Seattle, Washington
    Posts
    1,775

    Default Re: Mr. Awesome

    Quote Originally Posted by mdwflyer View Post
    From memory, and I'd happily be corrected if I got it wrong.

    The T-33 significantly improved the control issues. On arrival at Stead, due to system setup/fingers in the cockpit the tailwheel did not come down, and the tower let Neil know. He elected to do another circuit to try and get it sorted out. Unknown to him, a bullet was lodged in the oil cooler and came out at this time (The hangar had been shot-up by somebody, they found all the bullets but one. The side panels were off the airplane so it wasn't like looking for a bullet hole in the skin....) The oil pressure went away with the oil and the airplane didn't make the runway.

    I was planning on putting T-33 tail feathers on my Yak project until kids came along and changed life plans, now it belongs to someone else.

    Mark
    You're confusing two separate events.

    On departure from Van Nuys, the tail wheel fell off. Neil landed at Stead and it ground the tailwheel 'posts' down. So they replaced it with a new tailwheel. I have a photo of Randy Goss, Rick Brickert, and Dennis Sanders all bent over 'lifting' the tail of the Yak on their backs while they changed the wheel.

    Two days later during qualifying, Neil was taking off and that is when the bullet incident happened. He made the runway, but only one main gear was down (see my other post).

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Texas, Oregon
    Posts
    608

    Default Re: Mr. Awesome

    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Jim View Post
    They had modified it so the main gear had inner clamshell doors (as a stock Yak doesn't have any). Perestroika/Czech Mate has a mechanical system on its clamshells that when the tire retracts it closes the doors. On Mr. Awesome, there were two separate gear handles. You had to raise the gear then close the clamshells...two separate actions. And it was the reverse on landing, you had to open the clamshells and then lower the gear.

    In the heat of the emergency, Neil forgot to open the clamshells and lowered the gear, so the mains were trying to punch through the inner doors. One came down, the other hung up. That was why it went off the runway and cartwheeled.
    Thanks for the reply. I had known, but had since forgotten, about the inner gear doors. I witnessed the accident and expected that the airplane wouldn't be rebuilt (too much of a "Franken-plane" it seemed at the time), so I was surprised when the rebuild started, but not surprised that it passed through other owner's hands and rests neglected today.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Maui, Hawaii
    Posts
    598

    Default Re: Mr. Awesome

    If memory serves, the radio traffic at the time of the accident was something like Race Control: Race 97 your gear isn't down. Neil Anderson: I don't have an engine (In a very TERSE way).

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