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retroaviation
02-25-2008, 01:23 PM
:OT-2:

Sorry if this has been discussed recently and I've just missed it, but I haven't heard anything about the Dyna Cam engine in some time. It seemed like a pretty neat engine, but since it's kind of fallen off the radar (at least my radar), I reckon it must not've been as good as I'd thought.

Does anyone know about the engine I'm talking about?

Gary

Leo
02-25-2008, 01:27 PM
I do. 8 cylinders, few moving parts, very small frontal area. Thought it was a really cool idea. As I remember it was being tested in a Bonanza. Was a big deal in Air Progress for awhile then just dissappeared.

retroaviation
02-25-2008, 02:51 PM
Back in the late 90's, I had called them about purchasing one, but all they wanted to do is make me a dealer for them. I told 'em I didn't want to sell their engine, I wanted to buy their engine.

After that, I wasn't interested in dealing with those folks, but the engine always intrigued me.

Gary

jhall@jetav.com
02-25-2008, 03:57 PM
Looks like these guys own the technology, but I can't find much about the engine on their web site:

Jul 6, 2006
PORTLAND, Ore., July 6 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Axial Vector™ Engine Corporation (OTC Bulletin Board: AXVC - News) announced today that on May 16, 2006, Axial Vector™ Engine Corporation signed a Settlement Agreement and Mutual Release with Dennis Palmer and Patricia Wilks resolving the litigation filed by Axial Vector™ Engine Corporation against Palmer and Wilks over the purchase of the Dyna-Cam assets.

The settlement involved a confirmation by Palmer and Wilks of the agreements of June 30, 2003 wherein Axial Vector™ acquired all rights, titles, assets and interest to Dyna-Cam Engine Corporation, including related websites and domain names. As part of the agreement, the preliminary injunction granted to Axial Vector™ on November 17, 2005 will remain in place as a permanent injunction by Order of the Federal District Court docketed on June 13, 2006. The injunction permanently bars Palmer and Wilks and others acting in concert with them from:

displaying, controlling, and/ or operation of the website www.dynacam.com or any other domain containing the words "dyna-cam", "dynacam", "Dyna-Cam", or "Dynacam";
exhibiting any display, product, and advertisement bearing the mark Dyna-Cam, "Dyna-Cam Engine", or "Dyna-Cam Engine Corporation", and
making, using, selling, marketing, and offering for sale certain products using the name(s) and mark(s) containing the words "dyna-cam", "dynacam", "Dyna-Cam", or Dynacam.
Dr. Raymond Brouzes, President and CEO of Axial Vector™ Engine Corporation stated, "We are pleased to resolve this matter and remove any cloud over our ownership of the Dyna-Cam engine and its progeny."

Peashooter
02-25-2008, 03:58 PM
Nothing on Yahoo Search after 2002 when they were "aggressively seeking capital."

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-84992177.html

As I recall it was certified by the FAA.

(Ooops, see above!)

AirDOGGe
02-25-2008, 05:51 PM
Earlier this decade, another company had acquired Dyna-Cam and were going to develop the engine for aircraft AND marine use:



"Princeton Ventures, Inc., was incorporated in the State of Nevada
on May 10, 2001. The Company had not commenced operations. On
May 30, 2003, the Company exchanged 37,944,922 shares of its
common stock for all of the issued and outstanding shares of Aero
Marine Engine Corp. Aero was formed on December 30, 2002. Aero
had no operations and was formed to acquire the assets of Dyna-Cam
Engine Corporation. The Company changed its name from Princeton
Ventures, Inc. to Aero Marine Engine, Inc.

Additionally, on June 30, 2003, the Company acquired the operating
assets of Dyna-Cam Engine Corp. Dyna-Cam was a development stage
enterprise developing a unique, axial cam-drive, free piston,
internal combustion engine. Dyna Cam intended to produce and sell
the engine primarily for aircraft and marine applications. Dyna-
Cam had not generated significant revenues at the time of the
Company's acquisition."




I don't think they were ever able to get together enough money to develop it, and ended up selling it to another outfit (Axial Vector Engine Corp). There was some litigation over the name and some other stuff, with the original Dyna-cam folk losing:


"July 6, 2006
Axial Vector Engine Corp. said Thursday that is has signed a settlement agreement and mutual release with Dennis Palmer and Patricia Wilks resolving the lawsuit filed by Axial over the purchase of the Dyna-Cam assets.

The agreement was signed May 16, effective June 30. The settlement involved confirmation by Palmer and Wilks of the agreements wherein Axial acquired all rights, titles, assets and interest to Dyna-Cam Engine Corp., including related Web sites and domain names.
"

AXIAL is using the engine these days to run electrical generators (no expensive FAA certification required). Looks like they dropped the idea of an aviation or marine engine product completely.

Here's their website, which features some flash animations of the powerplant and complete generator package. They use to have more info about the engine, including pictures and drawings, but the site has changed since then:

http://www.axialvectorengine.com/index.html


--------------------------------------------------------

.
Picture of original Dyna-cam:
http://www.synelec.com.au/mustang/images/engines/dynacam_engine.jpg




Original Dyna-cam specs:

200 HP @ 2000 RPM
175 HP @ 1600 RPM

650ft.lb torque @ 1200 RPM
525ft.lb. torque @ 2000 RPM

373 Cubic Inches 265 Lbs Dry Weight

12 Cylinder, 6 Piston 0.40 Lb./Hp-Hr @ Cruise
3.25" Bore - 3.75" Stroke 0.47 Lb./Hp-Hr @ Full pwr.
Fuel Injected Dual Ignition or Single
Type Certificate # 293 13" Diameter x 40" Length


-------------------------------------------------------


This is what Axial Vector's aviation/marine engine looked like before they pulled the pictures and changed the site. I found this image on another site:

http://www.hover.za.pl/pl/silniki.html (scroll down to near bottom of page)

.

retroaviation
02-26-2008, 10:37 AM
Wow. I didn't know it turned so ugly. What a shame.

Thanks for the info, y'all.

Gary

TOR_DP
03-02-2008, 09:21 AM
I got their (DynaCam) investor package in the late 80s.

Its already FAA approved engine...

The original design dates back to the early '50s, and was tested/approved back then.

A similar "swash-plate" type engine is used in modern torpedoes.(!)

Glad its still around. Sorry it appears not bound for aircraft.


Wonder what ever happened to their Arrow that had one installed...

jdyahoo
03-27-2008, 10:47 AM
I remember seeing a short piece on it inside the back cover of Private Pilot magazine in 1982 or 1983. That was the first I'd ever heard of it. I was especially impressed by the fact(oid) that in it's original configuration, a 9-inch diameter by 12-inch long, (IIRC), version powered by steam produced 90 horsepower. (Would that be the Mark 37 steam torpedo, or the one before that?)

I was very disappointed to see that they were pursuing a 400-hp version at the height of the ultralight phenomenon. I still believe that's what broke them. Many's the time I wished that I set aside the money to buy their plastic cutaway demo model.

The next time I heard anything about them was 1993 or 1994 when I saw that they had gotten the 450-hp (?) engine FAA-certified, that it ran without any lubrication for 45 minutes, etc and they were seriously pushing a prospectus for investors. I didn't have any money to invest.

I was sad, but not in the least surprised, to see them go bankrupt.

First time Juke
01-15-2009, 02:22 AM
I found this: http://www.axialvectorengine.com

See the vids...200 hps in an engine sized 20 x 8.5 inches ?

The smaller engine yields 5 hps in 8x1,5 inches..here I put in on a combat model of 1/12 scale size ( speeds are also hair rising ):

First time Juke
01-15-2009, 04:04 AM
Just imagine four of those 200 hp engines in a ½ size 1000 lbs F8F-2....( ...or 6 of them souped up with nitrous is a pusher prop racer... 2400 hp easily ).

You could fly safely home with just one engine running ( of four ) with a clutch at the reduction allowing use any engine to turn the prop or all 4 to go fast.

First time Juke
01-15-2009, 01:43 PM
Another version could be a 2 seater LSA or a Sports Class plane.

500 km/t IAS ( 750 TAS )...about 1330 lbs flyweight.

Structure 2 mm ply + 5 mm balsa + 2 mm ply.

Simple and very light to produce.

Scale pilots are 6 ft 4 in.

200 hp engine is only 64 lbs ( 29 kg ) each so 4 x 64 = 252 lbs.


:yes:

King
01-15-2009, 08:27 PM
Another version could be a 2 seater LSA or a Sports Class plane.

500 km/t IAS ( 750 TAS )...about 1330 lbs flyweight.

Structure 2 mm ply + 5 mm balsa + 2 mm ply.

Simple and very light to produce.

Scale pilots are 6 ft 4 in.

200 hp engine is only 64 lbs ( 29 kg ) each so 4 x 64 = 252 lbs.


:yes:


oohhh k

looks like a fun ride for the passenger

B52Hfan
01-15-2009, 08:54 PM
Another version could be a 2 seater LSA or a Sports Class plane.

500 km/t IAS ( 750 TAS )...about 1330 lbs flyweight.

Structure 2 mm ply + 5 mm balsa + 2 mm ply.

Simple and very light to produce.

Scale pilots are 6 ft 4 in.

200 hp engine is only 64 lbs ( 29 kg ) each so 4 x 64 = 252 lbs.


:yes:

That's a very interesting design. I know there is quite a bit of equipment needed for flight and those 6'4" crew sure take up a lot of space. Where does the fuel for all those powerplants go? What kind of cooling will it use? It's a neat concept, on paper, for sure!

First time Juke
01-16-2009, 03:58 AM
That's a very interesting design. I know there is quite a bit of equipment needed for flight and those 6'4" crew sure take up a lot of space. Where does the fuel for all those powerplants go? What kind of cooling will it use? It's a neat concept, on paper, for sure!

Fuel would be on the wings...cooling like in a Rarebear..air cooling.

Bottom line is that engine that produces 3,4 hp per lbs is somehow overlooked.

The passenger is too much...a bit luggage there instead.

48 cylinders..is a lot...I bet they are expensive to manufacture !

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1LrmLHOUpg&eurl=http://www.axialvectorengine.com/

Leo
01-16-2009, 08:58 AM
You couldn't pay me to ride as passenger in that configuration! Backwards, reclined and with my face pinned against the glass... Not to say the concept would'nt be cool with a little refining.
The engine is water cooled is it not? Thats a lot of radiator area.

First time Juke
01-17-2009, 02:22 AM
Air cooled unlike the x375 from fifties...

First time Juke
01-18-2009, 06:36 AM
I also find the 40 000 hour TBO pretty cool.


The use of our engines in automobiles will catapult the vehicle to a new efficiency. Due to the huge gains in torque per horse power, 3.14:1, AVEC engine are three times as efficient in producing torque than any other engine in circulation today. The decrease in the number of parts also permits a 40,000 hour mean time to overhaul as compared to a 20,000 hour mean time to overhaul of the conventional internal combustion engines in the market.

The AVEC engine incorporates 50% fewer parts than any engine in existence which simply makes it half as likely to have anything go wrong whilst in operation. Our third generation engines weigh 68 pounds are 200 horse power and produce 640 pounds of torque, truly remarkable.

AVEC engines are not only lighter and smaller than conventional engines but also due to their efficiency whilst running, they emit less harmful substances into the atmosphere.

mayday51
01-19-2009, 12:54 AM
.....and I heard the Spainish went 30,000 miles on a Galleon.

First time Juke
01-19-2009, 01:04 AM
Pretty good Jim !

If that is true it has 50 % less moving parts than a rotary engine ( vankel ) and produces 3x torque and 40 000 h TBO and is 1/7th in weight...then why the heck aren't they everywhere..I mean they should have replaced also jet engines long time ago etc...where is the hick up here ?

rgds,

Juke

AirDOGGe
01-19-2009, 12:31 PM
Maybe it's because pretty much all aviation engine makers have had their pants sued off at one time or another, usually more than once, even when their engines weren't responsible for an incident/accident.

Remember, excessive and sometimes outrageous lawsuits are why Cessna got out of the general aviation business altogether for all those years, until changes were finally made to make the laws more reasonable.

You have to have pretty deep pockets, great insurance and a good group of lawyers if you want to get into the airplane engine business these days...It's easier, cheaper, and possibly more profitable to make power generators from the dyna-cams, as they have been doing.


Just my thoughts.

Leo
01-19-2009, 12:43 PM
I would agree. You could have spent $50 million developing and certifying it. Then a vendor's part failes and causes a crash. The vendor folds up under the resulting suit leaving you with the liability, and the choice of settling with any profits you have made (or will make) for 10 years, or fighting and trying to prove your engineering to people that do not understand a word of it in court. Or the product is misused or maintained improperly and you STILL lose the resulting wrongful death suit. It's a crazy world.
At least an aircraft engine as they pretty much are now is past the first hurdle with an excepted configuration. I am convinced that anti-gravity would not sell now due to the liability of an untested (as in already in service for umpteen years) technology. :D

First time Juke
01-20-2009, 02:49 AM
Airdogge and Leo !

Great to express toughts with you guys. It must be this way as you describe. Dyna Cam dudes may be little bitter and possibly give out slightly better figures as well. I have an expert here in Finland who says he has 100 000 pages of data on axial vector engines and that he has discussed this matter with transportation engineers and discovered that there are several weakpoints in the layout. I would love to believe him like I'd enjoy believe the Dyna Cam people.

It is like the Colt revolver..very compact and handy. I wonder if placing 2-6 of them into one mount and propel one prop via reduction gear ableing to shut down any damaged engine would give reliability more than a regular engine.

I know I will start to sound very dull repeating this same topic, but if what they say in Dyna Cam is true, then the mankind is burning 2x more gas in combustion engines in cars and aviation that they would have if chosen to use Dyna Cam type axial piston engines in the fifties.

What if they have solved all known problems of the engine by choosing right materials and lubricants etc ? Anyone with deep enough pockets to investigate this in real life and with concrete test results and not just educated guesses ?!

Any AC that I sketch/design with those engines gives me an edge ( drag/weight ) over any regular piston engine...and that bugs me a lot.

Why don't they have a real working engine ( of the 200 hp or the smaller one ) on their video instead of an animation ?

Leo
01-20-2009, 08:39 AM
I still think it's the fear of the new, both in public opinion and in liability. The Mazda rotary was a flash in the pan that was going to revolutionize the industry but it fell short of promises in actual use. I fear this would also, otherwise with the numbers it has it would make a great auto engine as a water cooled version.
It's safer to rely on proven configurations and improve them with new technology. My best example is the venerable Chevy 350. In 1981 it gave 170 HP on about 17 MPG, unless you leadfooted it. It was choked with state of the art smog to reduce emissions. The 350 in my 2001 car puts out 375 HP, gives 24-27 MPG and extremely less emissions without add-on smog controls. All due to lighter, better materials and better design. If that can be done with an existing platform, why risk a whole new design?

Skyracer
01-20-2009, 01:27 PM
Why don't they have a real working engine ( of the 200 hp or the smaller one ) on their video instead of an animation ?Because computer models are cheaper to produce than real machines, they can be made to appear as if they work, and they don't wear out.

BTW - All rights, etc. of Dyna-Cam were sold to Axial Vector Engine Corp in 2006. The AVEC website doesn't give me a warm feelng as a place I would want to invest my money.

mayday51
01-20-2009, 05:17 PM
It is like the Colt revolver..very compact and handy.


Why don't they have a real working engine ( of the 200 hp or the smaller one ) on their video instead of an animation ?


.....I know my colts work (have proven them my self)......

.....as to those engines.......the site info is very vague........
(that is the reason for the "mileage boast")


......as far as "wobble plate"engines.....I have converted a GM A6
A/C compressor to run as an air motor before.....(not an engine,
it ran on compressed air).......great torque,wild revs......
....no actual readings as this was a "garage experiment" in my younger days...


Juke, keep on dreaming and drawing,
just don't buy all the salesman says.

First time Juke
01-21-2009, 03:51 AM
.....I know my colts work (have proven them my self)......

Juke, keep on dreaming and drawing,
just don't buy all the salesman says.


Yeah ..I do that. Here is another thing you could get with 200 hp engine that size and weight; a pusher 2 feet shorter than Mini Imp with 2 to 3 times more punch !

Easiest way to do that would be to use 50 hp Limbach L550 air cooled 2-stroke about 20 kilos. Might save some weight in it, but lacks 150 hps.

First time Juke
01-21-2009, 01:23 PM
Here is the 50 hp version.

This is 1/3 bigger than V-MAX probe and about same size if little smaller than Micro Imp..and definitely smaller than Sierra-Sue by Northrop. Tail layout is like in LearFan 2100..proven good concept. Wing has forward sweep like Bugatti 100 Racer.

http://www.webcamsue.nl/vmax.html

Slightly longer nose geared version has 240 liters of luggage capacity.

Whadda ya say ?

This layout without luggage could take also Dyna Cam 200 hp on it. It would possibly also weigh around or under 650 lbs like this ( flyweight ). I won't guess the speeds but definitely somewhere 400 mph region with 200 hps.

Anyone interested...let's put some engineers to work on it..shall we ?!

:beerchug:

First time Juke
01-22-2009, 01:14 AM
I still think it's the fear of the new, both in public opinion and in liability. The Mazda rotary was a flash in the pan that was going to revolutionize the industry but it fell short of promises in actual use. I fear this would also, otherwise with the numbers it has it would make a great auto engine as a water cooled version.
It's safer to rely on proven configurations and improve them with new technology. My best example is the venerable Chevy 350. In 1981 it gave 170 HP on about 17 MPG, unless you leadfooted it. It was choked with state of the art smog to reduce emissions. The 350 in my 2001 car puts out 375 HP, gives 24-27 MPG and extremely less emissions without add-on smog controls. All due to lighter, better materials and better design. If that can be done with an existing platform, why risk a whole new design?


Leo I understand this well.

I brought few months back this topic about mileage...japanese team with a light female driver was able to drive a vehicle at 10 000 MPG...that is correct..there should be 4 zeros there is no error.

http://www.aafo.com/hangartalk/showthread.php?t=6871&page=2&pp=10

In this light I found 17 MPG not so excellent. New cars in Finland advertise 45-50 MPG ( 4,3-4,5 liters / 100 km ). We are talking about a lot smaller car than around Chevy 350 built vehicles..if it is a truck and used for great loads then it is cool. Otherwise it is just ok.

:thumbsup:

BTW: Does anyone know how SFC chart hould be read ?

I found this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specific_fuel_consumption when trying to find out how to calculate consumption of this http://www.limflug.de/files/pdf/DS-L550E.pdf and I am getting a hang of it now.

The RAMJET does not seem to be very costeffective...does it

I did get 4.2 gallon/h fuel consumption for the 50 hp Limbach 550 ccm engine..I assume that is right. Please correct me if I am wrong.

This would mean 3.5 l/100 km consumtion ( which is the same I figured for LearFan 2100 per person ) for my pusher and slightly better than for a new car here, but I'd be only carrying some luggage and a pilot...two seater without much luggage would be nearly as economical as a car....and pretty near the DA-11 fuel consumtion ( MPG 107 ). All this of course demands perfect execution of the aerodynamics and structure in the Max III.

First time Juke
01-30-2009, 05:11 AM
:OT-2:

Sorry if this has been discussed recently and I've just missed it, but I haven't heard anything about the Dyna Cam engine in some time. It seemed like a pretty neat engine, but since it's kind of fallen off the radar (at least my radar), I reckon it must not've been as good as I'd thought.

Does anyone know about the engine I'm talking about?

Gary


Could someone go and ask how they are doing ?

I am also very very interested about it. Even
if it wears out fast ( or maybe it doesn't ) the double output would be amazing in a small speedster ( ok overhaul the more often and you'll have the safety aspect covered ).

What works in a car 40 000 TbO cannot be that bad in a plane..in fact it was proven already in 1952 in Piper.

Here see it has got a fan inside...so it is cooled already...lotsa area to cool down with.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Ua4gFF0LQ4&eurl=http://www.axialvectorengine.com/index.html

First time Juke
02-02-2009, 04:57 AM
The 350 in my 2001 car puts out 375 HP, gives 24-27 MPG and extremely less emissions without add-on smog controls. All due to lighter, better materials and better design. If that can be done with an existing platform, why risk a whole new design?


Ever tought it this way...put it into a P-51D and the mileage will be even better...:thumbsup:

http://www.marcel-jurca.com/MJ7/77_51/MJ77_51_04_a.jpg

First time Juke
02-02-2009, 09:08 AM
http://www.fairdiesel.co.uk/Redrup.html

AlisoBob
02-07-2009, 11:08 AM
I was at an EAA Chapter 92 meeting in Westminister Ca, around 1997 or so....and they brought it out to test run in the parking lot.

It was converted to run on propane at this point, due to terrible problems with the fuel falling out of suspension when on gasoline.

They gave a detailed presentation, then went outside to fire it up.

I remember it sounded strong, and idled quite slowly and smoothly.

The power rating seemed quite optomistic, but who's to say.

They should have put it in a Bonneville type streamliner to work the bugs out, get the power up, and attract some $$$$.


It seemed workable.

First time Juke
02-10-2009, 01:05 AM
The patent for it goes like this ( http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/7059294/description.html ):

US Patent 7059294 - Orbital engine

US Patent Issued on June 13, 2006

Abstract Claims Description Full Text Abstract

An engine is disclosed including at least one piston which is positioned within a toroidal piston chamber. A method of operating an engine is disclosed wherein a piston is advanced in a toroidal piston chamber past a first valve and the first valve is closed to form a first ignition chamber area located within the piston chamber between the first valve and the rear side of the piston. A second valve is closed ahead of the piston to form a first exhaust removal chamber area located within the piston chamber between the second valve and the front side of the piston, the exhaust removal chamber including exhaust gases from a preceding ignition which occurred in the first ignition chamber area. A fuel mixture is introduced into the first ignition chamber area and ignited thereby advancing the piston further along the toroidal piston chamber.
Claims


What is claimed is:

1. A method of operating an engine, comprising the steps of: providing an engine comprising a base member including a toroidal piston chamber; a plurality of pistonsdisposed for orbital rotation within the piston chamber, each piston having a front side and a rear side; and a plurality of rotatable valves, each valve being configured to alternately close and open at least a portion of the piston chamber; advancinga first piston along its orbital rotation past a first valve and advancing a second piston along its orbital rotation past a second valve; closing the first valve behind the first piston to form a first ignition chamber area located within the pistonchamber between the first valve and the rear side of the first piston and closing the second valve behind the second piston to form a second ignition chamber area located within the piston chamber between the second valve and the rear side of the secondpiston and a first exhaust removal chamber area located within the piston chamber between the first valve and the front side of the second piston, the first exhaust chamber area including exhaust gases from a preceding ignition which occurred in thesecond ignition chamber area; closing a third valve ahead of the first piston to form a second exhaust removal chamber area located within the piston chamber between the third valve and the front side of the first piston, the second exhaust removalchamber including exhaust gases from a preceding ignition which occurred in the first ignition chamber area; introducing a first fuel mixture into the first ignition chamber area and a second fuel mixture into the second ignition chamber area; ignitingthe first fuel mixture thereby advancing the first piston further along its orbital rotation and simultaneously igniting the second fuel mixture thereby advancing the second piston further along its orbital rotation, wherein the ignition of the firstfuel mixture generates exhaust gases between the first piston and the first valve and forcing the exhaust gases in the first exhaust removal chamber out of the piston chamber through a first exhaust duct and wherein the ignition of the second fuelmixture generates exhaust gases between the second piston and the second valve and forcing the exhaust gases in the second exhaust removal chamber out of the piston chamber through a second exhaust duct; and opening the third valve to permit the firstpiston to advance past the third valve and opening the first valve to permit the second piston to advance past the first valve.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the third valve is the next valve that the first piston passes subsequent to passing the first valve and wherein the first valve is the next valve that the second piston passes subsequent to passing the secondvalve.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein the first valve, the second valve and the third valve are closed simultaneously.

4. The method of claim 3, further comprising the step of opening the second valve, wherein the first valve, the second valve and the third valve are opened simultaneously.

5. The method of claim 4, wherein the first piston and the second piston are coupled together by a connecting member which is coupled to an output member.

6. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of opening the first valve includes the steps of: providing an opening in the first valve; and rotating the first valve so that the opening is in alignment with the piston chamber.

7. An orbital engine comprising: a) a toroidal piston chamber; b) at least one piston disposed for orbital rotation within the piston chamber; c) at least one chambering valve for alternately closing and opening at least a portion of thepiston chamber; d) at least one intake duct for allowing a fuel mixture to enter the piston chamber; e) at least one ignition means for igniting the fuel mixture resulting in the combustion of the fuel mixture and the creation of combustion gases; f)at least one exhaust duct for allowing the combustion gases to exit the piston chamber, g) a connecting disc connected at a first location to the piston; and h) a circumferential slot through the piston chamber through which the connecting disc extends; wherein as the piston passes by the chambering valve, the chambering valve closes the piston chamber, the fuel mixture is introduced to an ignition chamber area within the piston chamber behind the piston and between the piston and the chambering valve,the ignition means ignites the fuel mixture, and the combustion gases impart power to the piston, thus causing the piston to continue the orbital rotation within the piston chamber.

8. The orbital engine as claimed in claim 7, further comprising a crankshaft connected to a second part of the connecting disc.

9. The orbital engine as claimed in claim 8, wherein the circumferential slot is located on an inner circumference of the toroidal piston chamber and the crankshaft is located along the axial centerline of the toroidal piston chamber.

10. The orbital engine as claimed in claim 8, wherein the circumferential slot is located on an outer circumference of the toroidal piston chamber and the crankshaft is a ring like structure located outside the outer circumference of thetoroidal piston chamber.

11. An orbital engine comprising: a) a toroidal piston chamber; b) at least one piston disposed for orbital rotation within the piston chamber and having a front side and a rear side; c) at least one chambering valve, with each valvecomprising a notch for alternately closing and opening at least a portion of the piston chamber; d) at least one intake duct for allowing a fuel mixture to enter the piston chamber; e) at least one ignition means for igniting the fuel mixture resultingin the combustion of the fuel mixture and the creation of combustion gases; f) at least one exhaust duct for allowing the combustion gases to exit the piston chamber, g) a connecting disc connected at a first part to the piston; and h) acircumferential slot through the piston chamber through which the connecting disc extends; wherein as the piston passes by the chambering valve, the chambering valve rotates to close the piston chamber so as to create an ignition chamber area within thepiston chamber behind the piston and between the closed chambering valve and the rear side of the piston, the fuel mixture is introduced to the ignition chamber area, the ignition means ignites the fuel mixture, and the combustion gases expand within theignition chamber area and impart power to the piston by contacting the rear side of the piston, thus causing the piston to continue the orbital rotation within the piston chamber.

12. The orbital engine as claimed in claim 11, further comprising a crankshaft connected to a second part of the connecting disc.

13. The orbital engine as claimed in claim 12, wherein the circumferential slot is located on an inner circumference of the toroidal piston chamber and the crankshaft is located along the axial centerline of the toroidal piston chamber.

14. An orbital engine comprising: a) a toroidal piston chamber; b) at least one piston disposed for orbital rotation within the piston chamber and having a front side and a rear side; c) at least one disc valve, with each disc valvecomprising a generally flat circular plate having a notch for alternately closing and opening at least a portion of the piston chamber; d) at least one intake duct for allowing a fuel mixture to enter the piston chamber; e) at least one ignition meansfor igniting the fuel mixture resulting in the combustion of the fuel mixture and the creation of combustion gases; f) at least one exhaust duct for allowing the combustion gases to exit the piston chamber; g) an ignition chamber area located withinthe piston chamber between the disc valve and the rear side of the piston and incorporating the intake duct and the ignition means; and h) an exhaust removal chamber area located within the piston chamber between the disc valve and the front side of thepiston and incorporating the exhaust duct, i) a connecting disc connected at a first part to the piston; and j) a circumferential slot through the piston chamber through which the connecting disc extends; wherein as the piston passes by the disc valve,the disc valve rotates to close the piston chamber so as to create the ignition chamber area, the fuel mixture is introduced to the ignition chamber area, the ignition means ignites the fuel mixture, and the combustion gases expand within the ignitionchamber area and impart power to the piston by contacting the rear side of the piston, thus causing the piston to continue the orbital rotation within the piston chamber, whereby the piston forces combustion gases from a previous ignition ahead of thepiston into the exhaust removal chamber and out through the exhaust duct.

15. The orbital engine as claimed in claim 14, further comprising a crankshaft connected to a second part of the connecting disc.

16. The orbital engine as claimed in claim 15, wherein the circumferential slot is located on an inner circumference of the toroidal piston chamber and the crankshaft is located along the axial centerline of the toroidal piston chamber.
Description


BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Technical Field

This invention generally relates to internal combustion engines and more specifically relates to internal combustion engines having an orbital piston movement in which the pistons move in a toroidal path.

2. Prior Art

Internal combustion engines generally can be categorized into three primary types: reciprocating or bore and stroke, rotary, and turbine. Each of these three types is well established and has been continuously enhanced throughout their longlineages.

A reciprocating or bore and stroke engine is an internal-combustion engine in which the crankshaft is turned by pistons moving up and down in cylinders. Typically, for automotive use, a reciprocating engine is of the four-stroke variety, inwhich an explosive mixture is drawn into the cylinder on the first stroke and is compressed and ignited on the second stroke, work is done on the third stroke and the products of combustion are exhausted on the fourth stroke.

A rotary engine is an internal-combustion engine in which power is transmitted directly to rotating components. For automotive uses, the Wankel.RTM. engine used in Mazda.RTM. automobiles is a common example. In other words, a rotary engine isan internal-combustion engine having combustion chambers generally with a triangular shaped piston that oscillates as it rotates.

A turbine engine is an engine in which the energy in a moving fluid is converted into mechanical energy by causing a bladed rotor to rotate. A typical turbine engine will have a set of rotor blades that induce and compress air. Fuel then isadded and ignited. The expanding hot combustion gases accelerate as they move through a set of turbine blades. The set of turbine blades is mechanically connected to the set of rotor blades, providing the power to make the set of rotor blades continueto spin and draw in fresh air. Broadly, a turbine is any of various machines in which the energy of a moving fluid is converted to mechanical power by the impulse or reaction of the fluid with a series of buckets, paddles, or blades arrayed about thecircumference of a wheel or cylinder.

Internal combustion engines of each of these three general types have their advantages and disadvantages. A reciprocating engine has a mature design, relatively low cost, moderate power to weight ratio, moderate size, and moderate fuelefficiency. A rotary engine has a less mature design, moderate cost, higher power to weight ratio, small size, and moderate to low fuel efficiency. A turbine has a mature design, high cost, high power to weight ratio, large size, and low fuelefficiency.

Thus, it can be seen that a need exists for an internal combustion engine combining at least some of the advantages of the three general types of internal combustion engines. For example, a preferred engine may have the relatively low cost ofmanufacture of a reciprocating engine and the high power to weight ratio and small size of a rotary engine, along with a higher fuel efficiency not generally found in any internal combustion engine. The present invention is directed to such a preferredengine.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is different from any engine known to the inventor. Unlike known engines, the present invention is not a rotary, turbine, or reciprocating engine. The engine of the present invention does have pistons, however the pistonsdo not travel in a straight line, like in known engines, but instead the pistons travel in a circle, and therefore do not have to stop and reverse direction, such as at the top and bottom of a stroke, allowing the engine of the present invention tooperate efficiently. The orbital motion of the engine of the present invention also lends itself to higher power and smoother operation. Like a turbine engine, the circular motion of the engine of the present invention is efficient. However, unlikethe engine of the present invention, a turbine engine does not have a closed volume for the force to act upon, and thus a turbine engine loses a quantity of power. To make up for this loss of power, a turbine engine must use more fuel, making it lesseconomical.

The engine of the present invention comprises an engine block preferably formed in two halves, although more or fewer sections (halves, thirds, quarters, etc.) can be used depending on the methods of manufacturing or the manufacturer's desires. For example, for a smaller engine, two halves should be suitable, while for a larger engine, the engine block may need to be formed from many sections. When attached together, the engine block is in the form of a torus having a generally hollowinterior, which is the equivalent of the cylinder of a conventional piston stroke engine, through and about which the pistons travel in a circular or orbital manner. A crankshaft is located axially through the center of the torus perpendicular to theplane of the torus. A connecting disc, which roughly corresponds to the connecting rods in a conventional reciprocating engine, extends radially between the crankshaft and the pistons, thus connecting the pistons to the crankshaft. Alternatively, acrankring is located peripherally outside the torus with the connecting disc extending radially outwardly between the pistons and the crankring, thus connecting the pistons to the crankring. Connecting rods or their equivalent can be an alternate to theconnecting disc.

To allow the connection between the piston and the crankshaft, the halved engine block has a groove or slot formed or cut circumferentially on the inside diameter of the torus, through which the connecting disc extends. The slot comprises theentire inside circumferential diameter of the torus, thus allowing the connecting disc to rotate an entire 360° through the engine and about the crankshaft. Similarly, to allow the connection between the piston and the crankring, the halvedengine block has a groove or slot formed or cut circumferentially on the outside diameter of the torus, through which the connecting disc extends. The slot comprises the entire outside circumferential diameter of the torus, thus allowing the connectingdisc to rotate an entire 360° through the engine.

The fuel induction system can be much like a normal reciprocating engine, with an exception of a valve train. Instead of using conventional tappet or poppet valves, the engine of the present invention uses a rotary disc valve, a reed valve, aball valve, or the like. This allows the engine to rotate at higher revolutions per minute without having the valves float. Additionally, this adds to the operational smoothness of the engine.

These features, and other features and advantages of the present invention, will become more apparent to those of ordinary skill in the relevant art when the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments is read in conjunction withthe appended drawings in which like reference numerals represent like components throughout the several views.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the engine of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a sectional top view of the engine.

FIG. 3A is a sectional side view of the engine through line 3'--3' of FIG. 2.

FIG. 3B is an enlarged side view of the left side portion of FIG. 3A.

FIG. 4A is a side view of an illustrative chambering valve disc used in the engine.

FIG. 4B is a side view of an alternate chambering valve disc used in the present engine.

FIG. 5 is a top view of one embodiment of a piston-connecting disc-crankshaft configuration used in the engine.

FIG. 6 is a top view of an alternate embodiment of a piston-connecting disc-crankshaft configuration used in the engine.

FIGS. 7 10 illustrate the rotation of the engine in four different positions as follows:

FIG. 7A illustrates a top view of an arbitrary initial position with the disc valve open, and FIG. 7B illustrates an exploded perspective view of the engine in the position shown in FIG. 7A.

FIG. 8A illustrates a top view of a position approximately 30° from the initial position with the disc valve closing, and FIG. 8B illustrates an exploded perspective view of the engine in the position shown in FIG. 8A.

FIG. 9A illustrates a top view of a position approximately 60° from the initial position, and FIG. 9B illustrates an exploded perspective view of the engine in the position shown in FIG. 9A.

FIG. 10A illustrates a top view of a position approximately 90° from the initial position, and FIG. 10B illustrates an exploded perspective view of the engine in the position shown in FIG. 10A.

FIG. 11 is a sectional top view of an alternative embodiment of the engine with multiple chambering valves per piston.

FIG. 12 is a sectional top view of an alternative embodiment of the engine with multiple pistons per chambering valve.

FIG. 13 shows a modular or multi-unit design incorporating four engine units.

FIG. 14 is a top view of one embodiment of a piston-connecting disc-crankring configuration used in the engine.

FIG. 15 is a side view of an alternate chambering valve cylinder used in the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now generally to FIGS. 1 15, preferred embodiments of the invention are shown. FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the engine 10 of the present invention showing the two half design of the piston chamber 12. FIG. 2 is asectional top view of a two piston 14 embodiment of the engine 10 showing the relative positioning of the various primary components of the engine 10. FIG. 3A is a sectional side view of the engine through line 3'--3' of FIG. 2 showing the general shapeof the piston chamber 12 and the positioning and operation of the chambering valves 16, which in this view are disc valves. FIG. 3B is an enlarged side view of the left side portion of FIG. 3A showing the relationship of the piston to the piston chamberand the valve cavity slot and how the connecting disc interacts with the piston chamber.

FIG. 4A is a side view of an illustrative disc valve 16 used in the engine showing a preferred single notch 80 structure. FIG. 4B is a side view of an alternate illustrative disc valve 16 used in the engine showing a double notch 80 structure. FIG. 15 is a side view of an alternate chambering valve cylinder 71 used in the engine showing a cutout notch 72 analogous to notch 80 of disc valve 16.

FIG. 5 is a top view of an alternate embodiment of a configuration showing the relationship between pistons 14, connecting disc 62 and crankshaft 60 that can be used in engine 10, which in this view is a solid configuration. FIG. 6 is a top viewof one embodiment of a configuration showing the relationship between pistons 14, connecting disc 62 and crankshaft 60 that can be used in engine 10, which in this view is a spoke type of configuration.

FIGS. 7 10 illustrate the rotation of the engine in four different positions. FIGS. 7A and 7B illustrate an arbitrary initial position with the chambering valves 16 open and the pistons 14 passing through the chambering valves 16. FIGS. 8A and8B illustrate a position approximately 30° from the initial position with the chambering valves 16 closing and the fuel mixture 30 beginning to enter the piston chamber 12 between the pistons 14 and the respective chambering valves 16 by way offuel intake ports 46, 50. FIGS. 9A and 9B illustrate a position approximately 60° from the initial position with the fuel mixture 30 ignited and expanding, imparting power to the pistons. FIGS. 10A and 10B illustrate a position approximately90° from the initial position with the pistons 14 continuing their powered travel through the piston chamber 12 and forcing exhaust gases ahead of them and out of exhaust ports 48, 52.

FIG. 11 illustrates an alternative embodiment with multiple chambering valves 16 per piston 14. FIG. 12 illustrates an alternative embodiment with multiple pistons 14 per chambering valve 16. Further, in a multiple module configuration, eachmodule can have one piston and chambering valve 16, preferably as long as the remaining modules are staggered to create a balanced force. Likewise, depending on size, weight and other factors, a single piston 14, single chambering valve 16 design can bebuilt.

FIG. 13 shows a modular or multi-unit design incorporating four engine units. More specifically, FIG. 13 shows the use of four engines 10 connected serially to a common crankshaft 60 to create a single engine with more power. Any number ofengine units can be connected together to create engines of more or less power. Further, engine 10 can be designed with a single piston 14 with single or multiple chambering valves 16, or a single or multiple pistons 14 with a single chambering valve16.

FIG. 14 shows a top view of one embodiment of a piston-connecting disc-crankring configuration used in the engine as an alternative to a connecting disc. The crankring is located outside of the main body of the engine, while the connecting discis located within the main body of the engine.

As shown in FIG. 1, an illustrative embodiment of engine 10 comprises first block half 42A and second block half 42B, which combine to result in engine block 42. With only minor or no exceptions, first block half 42A and second block half 42Bcan be identical to each other. Although engine 10 and thus engine block halves 42A, 42B can be oriented in any desired plane, for consistency of description engine 10 will be illustrated in the FIGs. and disclosed in this description of the preferredembodiments in a horizontal plane. In this regard, first block half 42A will be referred to as the bottom half and its associated elements and components will be referred to as the respective bottom elements and components and second block half 42B willbe referred to as the top half and its associated elements and components will be referred to as the respective top elements and components. However, this is in no way meant to limit the orientation of engine 10 to be horizontal, as engine 10 canoperate vertically or angularly.

Further, this specification discloses an illustrative engine 10 having two pistons 14, two chambering valves 16 and two associated chambering valve cavities 54, 56 in which chambering valves 16 spin, two fuel intake ducts 46, 50 (one associatedwith each chambering valve 16), and two exhaust ducts 48, 52 (one associated with each chambering valve 16). However, the invention is not limited to a two-piston and two-valve design, and may comprise any number of pistons and valves.

First block bottom half 42A comprises bottom piston chamber 12A, first intake duct bottom half 46A, first exhaust duct bottom half 48A, second intake duct bottom half 50A, second exhaust duct bottom half 52A, first chambering valve bottom cavity54A, and second chambering valve bottom cavity 56A. Second block top half 42B comprises top piston chamber 12B, first intake duct top half 46B, first exhaust duct top half 48B, second intake duct top half 50B, second exhaust duct top half 52B, firstchambering valve top cavity 54B, and second chambering valve top cavity 56B. When first block bottom half 42A and second block top half 42B are placed together to form engine block 42, the various component halves cooperate with each other, namely,bottom piston chamber 12A cooperates with top piston chamber 12B to form piston chamber 12, first intake duct bottom half 46A cooperates with first intake duct top half 46B to form first intake 46, first exhaust duct bottom half 48A cooperates with firstexhaust duct top half 48B to form first exhaust duct 48, second intake duct bottom half 50A cooperates with second intake duct top half 50B to form second intake 50, second exhaust duct bottom half 52A cooperates with second exhaust duct top half 52B toform second exhaust duct 52, first chambering valve bottom cavity 54A cooperates with first chambering valve top cavity 54B to form first chambering valve cavity 54, and second chambering valve bottom cavity 56A cooperates with second chambering valve tocavity 56B to form second chambering valve cavity 56.

With the block halves 42A, 42B bolted together to form engine block 42, engine block 42 comprises a torus having a generally hollow interior, which is piston chamber 12, which is the equivalent of the cylinder or cylinders of a conventionalpiston stroke engine. Pistons 14 travel in a circular or orbital manner through and around piston chamber 12. Crankshaft 60 preferably is located axially through the center of the torus perpendicular to the plane of the torus, and pistons 14 andcrankshaft 60 rotate axially about the axis that is the axial centerline of crankshaft 60. Connecting disc 62 extends radially between crankshaft 60 and pistons 14, thus connecting pistons 14 to crankshaft 60. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 14, acrankring 162 is located peripherally outside the torus with connecting disc extending radially outwardly between pistons 14 and crankring, thus connecting pistons 14 to crankring 162.

To allow the connection between pistons 14 and crankshaft 60, engine block 42 has a groove or slot 64 formed or cut on the inside circumference (that is, at the extent of the smallest radius or diameter) of the torus, through which connectingdisc 62 extends. Slot 64 extends around the entire inside circumference of the torus, thus allowing connecting disc 62 to rotate an entire 360° through engine 10 and about crankshaft 60. Similarly, to allow the connection between pistons 14 andcrankring, engine block 42 has a groove or slot (not shown) formed or cut on the outside circumference (that is, at the extent of the largest radius or diameter) of the torus, through which connecting disc 62 extends. In this embodiment, slot extendsaround the entire outside circumference of the torus, thus allowing connecting disc 62 to rotate an entire 360° through engine 10.

FIG. 2 is a top view of engine 10 with second block top half 42B removed to better show the internal structure of engine 10, particularly the circular shape of piston chamber 12, pistons 14, connecting disc 62, intake ducts 46, 50, and exhaustducts 48, 52. FIG. 3A is a sectional side view of engine 10 through line 3'--3' of FIG. 2, with second block top half 42B in place, to better show the internal structure of engine 10, particularly chambering valves 16 and chambering valve cavities 54,56. FIG. 3B is an enlargement of the left side of FIG. 3B to better show the relationship of the various structures of engine 10 and how connecting disc 62 interacts with piston chamber 12.

FIG. 4A is a side view of an illustrative chambering valve 16, namely disc valve 16, used in engine 10. Disc valve 16 is a flat circular plate having a generally trapezoidal notch 80. Disc valve 16 is rotationally mounted within chamberingvalve cavity 54, 56 such that disc valve 16 extends into piston chamber 12. Disc valve 16 is located in a plane generally normal to the plane of piston chamber 12 such that disc valve 16 rotates through the annular cross-section of piston chamber 12. As discussed in more detail below, as disc valve 16 rotates, it alternately seals piston chamber 12 when the flat circular plate region is rotating through piston chamber 12 and opens piston chamber 12 when notch 80 is rotating through piston chamber 12. When notch 80 is rotating through piston chamber 12, piston 14 can pass unimpeded through notch 80 as piston 14 rotates around piston chamber 12. At other times, the flat circular plate region seals off piston chamber 12 creating a sealed ignitionchamber area 90 for ignition of the fuel and a sealed exhaust removal chamber area 92 for exhaustion of combustion products. Notch 80 is sized such that piston chamber 12 remains completely open as piston 14 travels past disc valve 16, thus the reasonfor the trapezoidal shape rather than a round opening.

Chambering valve 16 is mechanically connected to crankshaft 60 or the equivalent such that chambering valve 16 rotates in a coordinated manner with crankshaft 60. In the two-piston disc valve embodiment shown in the FIGs., disc valve 16 andcrankshaft 60 rotate in a 2:1 ratio. That is, as crankshaft 60 rotates once, disc valve 16 must rotate twice to allow both pistons 14 to rotate unimpeded through notch 80. For more or fewer pistons 14, the rotation ratio between disc valve 16 andcrankshaft 60 will change according to the number of pistons 14. Alternatively, chambering disc 16 can have a plurality of notches 80, thus allowing a like plurality of pistons 14 to pass by chambering disc 16 per revolution of chambering disc 16. Forexample, as shown in FIG. 4B a chambering disc 16 having two notches 80 opposite each other would only have to rotate once to allow two pistons to rotate through the notches 80, resulting in chambering disc 16 and crankshaft 60 rotating in a 1:1 ratiofor a two-piston two-chambering disc embodiment. Those of ordinary skill in the art can design the appropriate mechanical and gearing linkages, or other types of linkages, between crankshaft 60 or the equivalent and chambering valves 16 such that notch80 or the equivalent is rotating through piston chamber 12 as piston 14 approaches and passes by chambering valve 16 within piston chamber 12.

An alternate chambering valve 16 is shown in FIG. 15, which illustrates a cylinder valve 71 having a cutout notch 72. Cylinder valve 71 rotates about vertical axis A with cutout notch 72 rotating through piston chamber 12. The rotation ofcylinder valve 71 is timed such that cutout notch 72 aligns with piston chamber 12 as piston 14 approaches and passed through cutout notch 72 analogously to piston 14 passing through notch 80 of disc valve 16 shown in FIG. 7A and FIG. 7B. Chamberingvalve cavity 54, 56 would be in the same relative location as shown in FIG. 7A and FIG. 7B, as well as the other relevant FIGs., but instead of being a disc-shape would be a cylinder shape to accommodate cylinder valve 71. With other alternatechambering valves 16, such as a ball valve or a reed valve, chambering valve cavity 54, 56 would be structured to accommodate such alternate shape embodiments.

FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate preferred embodiments of the structure and structural relationship among pistons 14, connecting disc 62 and crankshaft 60, with FIG. 5 illustrating a solid design incorporating a solid disk or plate 70 and FIG. 6illustrating a spoke design. In the spoke design an outer ring 68 extends between spokes, wherein in the solid design, the outer edge and the region proximal to the outer edge acts as the outer ring 68. Pistons 14 are attached at or proximal to theouter circumference of connecting disc 62 or outer ring 68 at predetermined positions. As can be seen in FIG. 3B, outer ring 68 extends into slot 64 and with suitable sealing means (not shown) closes slot 64 in such a manner to allow outer ring 68 torotate about slot 64 and maintain the general integrity of piston chamber 12. The cooperating structure of slot 64, outer ring 68, and known seals or sealing devices, maintains piston chamber 12 as a generally sealed enclosure. A lubricant such as oilor a slippery material such as Teflon.RTM. can be injected or placed between outer ring 68 and slot 64 to reduce friction that may be generated as outer ring 68 rotates. Crankshaft 60 is attached perpendicularly at the axial center of connecting disc62 or through the axial center of disk 70.

FIGS. 7 10 illustrate the general operation of engine 10 by illustrating the rotation of engine 10 in four different positions. FIGS. 7A and 7B illustrate an arbitrarily chosen initial position with chambering valves 16 open and pistons 14passing through chambering valves 16. In this position, pistons 14 have just completed exhausting fuel combustion products out through exhaust ducts 48, 52 and are passing through notches 80 in preparation for fuel intake.

FIGS. 8A and 8B illustrate a position approximately 30° from the initial position shown in FIGS. 7A and 7B with chambering valves 16 closing and fuel mixture 30 (small circles) beginning to enter piston chamber 12 between the pistons 14and the respective chambering valves 16 by way of fuel intake ports 46, 50. The volume of the piston chamber 12 located between the closed chambering valve 16 and the rear side of the piston 14 is the ignition chamber area 90, which incorporates theintake port 46, 50 and the ignition means 96. At the moment (or slightly thereafter) chambering valves 16 rotate to close off piston chamber 12, a spark or other ignition means 96, such as a spark plug, causes fuel mixture 30 to explode (burn) inignition chamber area 90 causing a rapid expansion of the combustion gases, as in conventional internal combustion engines.

FIGS. 9A and 9B illustrate a position approximately 60° from the initial position shown in FIGS. 7A and 7B with fuel mixture 30 ignited and expanding (large circles), imparting power to pistons 14. This forces pistons 14 to continuetraveling in the same direction of rotation, which in turn is transmitted via connecting disc 62 to crankshaft 60. Chambering valves 16 still are closing off piston chamber 12 during this step.

FIGS. 10A and 10B illustrate a position approximately 90° from the initial position shown in FIGS. 7A and 7B with pistons 14 continuing their powered travel through piston chamber 12 and forcing exhaust gases from a preceding combustionahead of them and out of exhaust ports 48, 52. Chambering valves 16 still are closing off piston chamber 12 during this step, forcing exhaust gases from a preceding combustion to exit piston chamber 12 through exhaust ports 48, 52. The volume of thepiston chamber 12 located between the closed chambering valve 16 and the front side of the piston 14 is the exhaustion chamber area 92, which incorporates the exhaust port 48, 52. As pistons 14 move closer to chambering valves 16 (that is, each piston14 is moving closer to the next sequential chambering valve 16), notch 80 rotates into piston chamber 12 allowing pistons 14 to pass through notch 80, returning to the position shown in FIGS. 7A and 7B.

FIG. 11 illustrates an alternative embodiment with multiple chambering valves 16 per piston 14. For example, there can be two chambering valves 16 and two, four, six, eight, or more pistons 14 in multiples of two, with the multiple pistons 14being separated equidistant around piston chamber 12 so that the power applied to connecting disc 62 is balanced. Likewise, there can be three chambering valves 16 cooperating with three, six, nine, or more pistons 14 in multiples of three. FIG. 12illustrates an alternative embodiment with multiple pistons 14 per chambering valve 16. In a multiple module configuration, the possibility exists that each module could have one piston 14, and or one chambering valve 16, as long as the remainingmodules are staggered to create a balanced force. Depending on size, weight and other factors, a single piston 14, single chambering valve 16 design could be built.

Fuel mixture 30 can be valved or injected into ignition chamber area 90 in any conventional or future developed manner, such as by fuel injection systems timed to coincide with the proper location of pistons 14. Thus, a fuel injection system, orother fuel introduction system or means, can be timed or connected with the rotation of crankshaft 60 and/or chambering valves 16 by known or future developed mechanical, electrical, electronic, or optical means, or the equivalent. Those of ordinaryskill in the art can incorporate such means without undue experimentation.

Preferably, the fuel induction system is much like a normal reciprocating engine, with an exception of a valve train. Instead of using conventional tappet or poppet valves, engine 10 of the present invention can use a rotary disc valve, a reedvalve, ball valve, or the like. This allows engine 10 to rotate at higher revolutions per minute without having the valves float. Additionally, this adds to the operational smoothness of engine 10.

Exhaust gases emitted from exhaust ports 48, 52 can be directed through an exhaust system (not shown) to the atmosphere or to an exhaust remediation system. Conventional exhaust components such as catalytic converters and mufflers can beincorporated as desired or necessary.

FIG. 13 shows a modular or multi-unit design incorporating four engine units. More specifically, FIG. 13 shows the use of four engines 10 connected serially to a common crankshaft 60 to create a single engine with more power. Because engineblock 42 is of a unit design, each engine block 42 can be identical to other engine blocks 42 and can be combined to create a modular or multi-unit design for more power. Various numbers of engine blocks 42 can be connected serially about a commoncrankshaft 60 and all can be used to power common crankshaft 60. Further, engine block 42 can be made in various sizes for various power needs. Smaller engine blocks 42 can be made for applications such as lawn mowers and larger engine blocks can bemade for applications such as automobile engines. Any number of engine units can be connected together to create engines of more or less power.

Engine 10 can be air-cooled, dissipative-cooled, or liquid-cooled. The low stress and smoothness of engine 10 can lead to such benefits and possibilities. Various known and conventional cooling systems (not shown) can be applied to engine 10 bythose of ordinary skill in the art without undue experimentation. An exemplary air-cooled system can comprise directional vanes for directing cooling air towards the various components of engine 10. An exemplary dissipative-cooled system can compriseheat sinks or vanes to pull heat from the various components of engine 10. An exemplary liquid-cooled system can comprise liquid circulatory pipes or ducts much like the liquid cooling systems of conventional internal combustion engines. Such coolingmethods and systems are known in the art.

The engine design of the present invention has a number of benefits. This engine has increased efficiency over reciprocating engines based on the centrifical momentum generated versus the transfer of kinetic and potential energy in areciprocating piston. Additionally, with this engine, there is no need to compress the fuel air mixture between the piston head and the cylinder or to create a vacuum for pulling the fuel air mixture into the piston chamber. Further, the force of thepiston is always perpendicular to the direction of rotation and consistently is the same distance from the axis of rotation.

This engine has increased horsepower and torque. The torque increase is a result of a longer torque arm. This engine can turn at higher revolutions per minute without detrimental changes of direction of the pistons, and therefore is lessself-destructing. There is no reciprocating mass and the valve train is not restricted by the revolutions per minute of the engine. This engine also has a decreased level of complexity when compared to current engines, has fewer moving parts, andeasier maintenance. This engine further has less internal friction and, as a result, can utilize needle, roller, or ball bearings rather than plain bearings found in conventional engines.

This engine has a higher power to weight ratio, meaning it can be smaller and have a decreased weight for the amount of power generated. The structure of this engine can be less rigid and use less material. As a result, this engine can bescaled up or down in size for use in a variety of devices, from small-sized gardening equipment such as weed trimmers and lawn mowers, to medium-sized engines such as motorcycle engines and electrical generators, to large-size automotive engines, to evenlarger-sized locomotive, ship, and power plant engines.

Further, this engine is modular in design in that several engine units can be stacked together to create a multi-unit design, analogous to multi-cylinder conventional engines. This modular design makes it easier to add performance by simplyadding additional units, decreases the cost of manufacturing as each unit can be identical, and makes it easier maintain as individual units can be replaced upon malfunction. In other words, combining units can be considered to be combining completelyseparate engines combined than adding cylinders. Adding cylinders to a standard engine on a shop or consumer level is not possible. Also, if a cylinder goes bad in a standard engine, the entire engine has to be rebuilt. With this engine, an individualcan easily add or remove modules. If one module goes bad, one simply can replace or repair only that module.

The above detailed description of the preferred embodiments, examples, and the appended figures are for illustrative purposes only and are not intended to limit the scope and spirit of the invention, and its equivalents, as defined by theappended claims. One skilled in the art will recognize that many variations can be made to the invention disclosed in this specification without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

* * * * *
Other References
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Weissler, Paul, “The Little Engine That May,” Popular Mechanics, May 1, 2000, three pages.
Stokes, Myron D., “Quantum Parallel: The Saint-Hilaire ‘Quasiturbine’ As The Basis For a Simultaneous Paradigm Shift In Vehicle Propulsion Systems,” Dec. 15, 2003, fourteen pages.
Unknown Author, “Quasiturbine in the Medias,” http://www.quasiturbine.com/ERelationInTheMedias.htm, eleven pages.
Unknown Author, “Quasiturbine—A New Approach,” http://quasiturbine.promci.qc.ca/, six pages.
Jayasuriya, L., “The Internal Combustion Engine with Oscillating Flaps,” http://www.oengine.com/, four pages.
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VGT Technologies, Inc., “Roundengine,” www.roundengine.com/roundengine—details/patenten—technology.htm, 1 pg.
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Karim, G.A. and Shrestha, O.M. Bade, “The V.G.T.′ Engine, The Performance of a Variable Geometry Toroidal Engine,” VGT Technologies, Inc., 46 pgs.; and Appendix: Karim, G.A. and Shrestha, O.M. Bade, “A Description of the Predictive Model Modified for Application to the VGT Engine”, S.A.E. Paper No. 1999-01-3482, 18 pgs.


I wonder if the patent is valid elsewhere too ? The original invention is from late forties..isn't it old enuf so that everyone can use it ?

Propellerhead
02-10-2009, 08:42 AM
TWEET!!!

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/68/ScottGreenNFL.jpg

SCROLLING VIOLATION!!! 15 YARDS. FOURTH DOWN!

AirDOGGe
02-10-2009, 11:48 AM
Wouldn't it have been easier to simply post a link to the text?

First time Juke
02-11-2009, 01:39 AM
Sure..I was busy yesterday. I tought it was cool cause then I could read it once in a while here to know what it is all bout.

I think I added a link too at the top...but a warning of the lenght of the description would have been fair.. I agree...sorry everyone.

ilyan
12-29-2011, 10:13 AM
The Dyna Cam engine was bought out and perfected by a company based in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) several years ago. That company is now called Axial Vector Energy Corporation (AVEC). This engine design is so good and so revolutionary, AVEC apparently wants to horde it from consumer hands, or is only allowed by higher authorities to distribute it to strictly approved clients. You cannot buy one. AVEC only sells to government and military organizations. See my article on my personal blog at earthsink.blogspot.com for more details on this topic, and for a link to the AVEC website.

Happy New Year!
:beerchug:

AirDOGGe
12-29-2011, 08:35 PM
Are you sure? Up until now Dyna-cam and the people who took it over were always in the USA. Perhaps they were bought out recently.


Their website at http://www.aveccorporation.com/ still says "AVEC Corporation is a United States public company (Trading Symbol:AVEC) whose mission is to bring the next breakthroughs in low cost, clean, efficient, energy technologies to a needy world."


Anyway this very thread we are posting in already has our discussion as to why you won't see this engine in an airplane soon...legal issues. Give it a read!

ilyan
12-29-2011, 11:20 PM
I think the website you are looking for is the following:

http://www.axialvectorengine.com/contactus.htm

This company used to be called the Axial Vector Engine Corporation when it bought out Dyna-Cam in 2006, and later changed names to Axial Vector Energy Corporation.

The legal issues preventing this engine from being used in aircraft are part of the conspiracy. There is no logical reason not to use this engine in an airplane. The concept for this type of engine originated before World War Two, and has been explored for use in torpedo propulsion. It is ideal for any long, slender vehicle requiring low frontal area and high torque.

It has been successfully tested in at least one airplane, a Piper Arrow, in 1987, and dramatically increased the aircraft's climb rate. See the article titled "Power Revolution" by Fred Mackerodt in the June, 1989 edition of Popular Science Magazine. http://books.google.com/books?id=BeQDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA57&lpg=PA57&dq=dynacam+engine+in+piper+arrow&source=bl&ots=ntvWO-ROTD&sig=Y0JPTc39apAas6rW-NT1lOExKpI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=hk_9Tue9MMqDtgeW3q3QBg&ved=0CEUQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=dynacam%20engine%20in%20piper%20arrow&f=false

See also:
http://www.scribd.com/doc/57689642/Seminar-REPORT-ON-DYNACAM-ENGINE

See also:
http://axialvectorenergy.com/docs/AVEC_Presentation.pdf

"The history of this engine is proving hard to track down, not least because access to the old dynacam.com website in internet archives is blocked; clearly this is part of The General Conspiracy. However, the story so far: the engine appears to originate from a design by the Blazer brothers, who worked for Studebaker in 1916. They sold the rights to Karl Herrmann, Studebaker's head of engineering. He developed it over many years, taking out a patent in 1941; see US patent 2237989...The engne received FAA Type Certificate E-293 on Dec 31, 1981."
http://www.douglas-self.com/MUSEUM/POWER/unusualICeng/axial-ICeng/axial-IC.htm

On the above website, scroll down to the nearly the bottom to find more information on the Dyna-Cam engine concept. It's not a new concept, but the fact that it is now in operation among exclusive clientele is new as of 2006 and says volumes about its quality.

"Axial Vector Energy Corporation serves as a publicly traded holding company, whose mission is to bring the next breakthroughs in low cost, clean, efficient, energy technologies to a needy world. Axial Vector Energy Corporation and its partners are positioned to become unrivalled leaders in international energy markets with technologies that produce more efficient, cost effective, environmentally sensitive, and versatile solutions for use in a wide variety of important applications around the world." http://www.axialvectorengine.com/vision.htm

"...for use in a wide variety of important applications around the world." Yeah, everything except consumer applications, which are the most important set of applications in the world. It's almost as bad as hording air and water.

It's a conspiracy any way you look at it.
:rolleyes:

http://earthsink.blogspot.com

AirDOGGe
12-30-2011, 11:18 AM
"The history of this engine is proving hard to track down, not least because access to the old dynacam.com website in internet archives is blocked; clearly this is part of The General Conspiracy.


I think you are reading too much into this "Conspiracy" thing.

Websites aren't forever like a book in a library. You have to keep paying to keep them on the 'net.


When Dyna-cam when out of business, they just let the domain lapse, rather than keep paying for a worthless site advertising a product they no longer owned.

Nothing has been blocked. The site just doesn't exist anymore.



If you visit WAYBACK.ORG, you can still find copies of the old website, like this one:

http://web.archive.org/web/20020327232802/http://www.dynacam.com/




And if you want background on the engine and others of similar design, plus those that came before and who inspired it, check here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swashplate_engine
No conspiracies here...Just business as usual. Companies come and companies go.

ilyan
12-30-2011, 12:21 PM
I admit, I tend to jump to conspiracy conclusions a bit too easily, but my reason for suspecting a conspiracy is not based on old websites no longer accessible or companies that have gone out of business. My concern is that an engine of such effective and versatile design is being exclusively operated by and exclusively marketed to elite clientele, specifically government and military organizations, when it could do so much more good if also allowed to enter the consumer markets. It's not some top secret technology that poses a national security issue. It's a piston engine. A really good one. Why keep it away from consumer applications?

Anyway, thanks for the additional links and info. Truly fascinating.
:thumbsup:

http://earthsink.blogspot.com

Race5
12-30-2011, 12:37 PM
I admit, I tend to jump to conspiracy conclusions a bit too easily, but my reason for suspecting a conspiracy is not based on old websites no longer accessible or companies that have gone out of business. My concern is that an engine of such effective and versatile design is being exclusively operated by and exclusively marketed to elite clientele, specifically government and military organizations, when it could do so much more good if also allowed to enter the consumer markets. It's not some top secret technology that poses a national security issue. It's a piston engine. A really good one. Why keep it away from consumer applications?

Anyway, thanks for the additional links and info. Truly fascinating.
:thumbsup:

http://earthsink.blogspot.com

No one is "keeping it away from consumer applications". If it was a better idea / product than what is currently available then it would be available. As it is, it's nothing more than a unique answer to a question that has never been ask.

ilyan
12-30-2011, 06:59 PM
I respectfully disagree. The Axial Vector Engine is obviously a better idea than what's already available, or AVEC and its partners and clients wouldn't be demanding exclusivity. AVEC and their clients have something better than anything else out there and they know it, and they don't want anyone else to have it. They don't want anyone competing with their golden goose.

Then there are the leaders of the mainstream parts and services industries and the petroleum industries who fear what such an engine would mean for their businesses (same goes for the electric car). The prospect of such an engine becoming a consumer staple might threaten the lifestyles of the people at the top of such well established industries. They have trillions of dollars at stake, not to mention their positions of power and prestige, none of which they are willing to compromise for a new vision. No paradigm shift on their watch.

Understandably, there's an industrial inertia, and at some levels a social inertia to be overcome when introducing a better solution into widespread operation. But it's another thing entirely when the producers and lawmakers involved with that better solution impose policies that strictly limit the distribution of the solution and deliberately inhibit the widespread adoption of its use.

There will come a day when such policymakers will lose their grip, and the better solutions will come directly from the hands and minds of innovative consumers. It's only a matter of time before somebody copies the idea in direct defiance of patent rights and intellectual property rights. The entire Chinese economy thrives on doing exactly that. The main problem with Chinese craftsmanship is cheap materials and abysmal product quality.

But I digress (:OT-2:)

Cheers!:beerchug:

http://earthsink.blogspot.com

AAFO_WSagar
12-30-2011, 08:04 PM
You guys mind if I move this thread to a section more apropriate? (probably the air race designer section?)

ilyan
12-30-2011, 08:37 PM
No problem.
:thumbsup:

AirDOGGe
01-19-2012, 11:20 AM
Lotta info on these engines at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swashplate_engine and http://www.aqpl43.dsl.pipex.com/MUSEUM/POWER/unusualICeng/axial-ICeng/axial-IC.htm

IcePaq
01-23-2012, 06:34 AM
I believe they flew it 7 hours and not 700 hours.

Monkeyron
06-12-2012, 04:30 PM
I have been doing some research on this Motor Design. This is going to be so much fun! Now I can't get into the logistics of this just yet, but will soon if it all works out. It's in the works!

What do you think if we took this basic design, added our Patented Process to it?
What you will have is:
You will have a motor that uses no Air, has no Valves, has no exhaust, has no heating so has no need for a Cooling system. It does not use Hydrocarbon Fuels. It has no combustion. Has ZERO Emissions. It is sealed and will run in Outer Space as well as under water.
I know! It's too good to be true.

Preliminary Dyno test on our Proto-type showed us that a 1-liter motor at 1800 RPM produces 274 Horse Power and 800 lbs of torque!

We are going to go in to production soon. It won't be until September before we will show it Publicly. The CEO is superstitious. He said ( we all have seen this) that is a product is shown before it is available to the Public, is was doomed to succeed.
So we are going in production in 8 countries at the same time to guaranty it's survival.

I will be starting manufacturing here hopefully next month.
Wish me luck!

Have a wonderful day!
M~R :beerchug:

errolc
07-29-2012, 09:57 PM
Because computer models are cheaper to produce than real machines, they can be made to appear as if they work, and they don't wear out.

BTW - All rights, etc. of Dyna-Cam were sold to Axial Vector Engine Corp in 2006. The AVEC website doesn't give me a warm feeling as a place I would want to invest my money.

Hello everyone...I'm a newbie to the site which I fell into looking to find what happened to DynaCam/Axialvector.

This seems to be one of the treads which is going to take a loooong time to go away.

Skyracer was DEAD right about being wary about investing in...Chuck Jaffe from Investment Weekly warned in 2006...
"If you listen to business talk radio, you might hear executives from Axial Vector Engine Corp. tell a great story about a company that sounds like a strong buy.
It's a tale of developing a new, unique type of internal-combustion engine, one that generates more energy for less effort. It's hard to listen without imagining countless applications for the technology in today's energy-mad global economy.
By the time the corporate brass is done talking, you're ready to go check out the firm's Web site and ask for its investor kit.
But if you go any further than that, you're headed for a Stupid Investment of the Week, because Axial Vector Engine bought the radio time for the interview, and the executives gave a description of the company that, suffice it to say, smoothed out the rough spots...In the case of Axial Vector Engine, the big problem is hype, and how the stock doesn't quite live up to the spin...it has been involved in nearly 20 paid interviews in the last year-plus on three syndicated shows -- two national, one regional to New England -- hosted by Stu Taylor.
"...there is more...http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/axial-vector-engine-runs-hype/story.aspx?guid=%7B948DA676-EB93-44F4-8B70-599AD158408D%7D
but to sum it up...hind sight is a wonderful thing...and history speaks for its self...but thats enough of the Cliché's...gotto
http://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin/2012/34-66536.pdf Order Instituting Administrative Proceedings & Notice of Hearing Pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act...Airbee Wireless Ltd, Axial Vestor Engine Corp (n/k/a Avec Corp), and Exploration Drilling International Inc...After investigation the division of enforcement alleges that...ABE is delinquent in its periodic filings with the commissions...since 2008

As a little rundown on what I know of the Dynacam...As an appetiser there is an interesting & easy read written by Craig McLanahan 1998 "Barrel Aircraft Engines: Historical Anomoly or Stymied inovation?"...also go to freepatents search-us1828353 Bleser 1931 is the beginning of the Dynacam Engine...Bleser was an engineer for Studybaker and collegue of Karl Herrmann.

Anyway to cut a long story short(ish)...Blesers design began at a time when most engine development work was sponsored by govt funding and during a rather unsettled time leading up to ww2, there was a LOT of political influence in how & where engine development was directed.

There have been numerous patents filed and prototypes attempted over time to no avail for what ever reasons...some political such as RR's 26ltr 2-stroke V12 Creche and Napiers Deltic British rails mis-management of its service schedules.

As for AxialVector I have to ask why the hell would you take a design which had recieved FAA certification in 1981 (which cost Dynacam $4m us) and replace it with something "better" when all they had to do was put it into production for customer base that was very keen to get it. As I see it the Dynacam Co simply needed funds to get it into gear so to speak.

I give Herrmann & the "Dynacam" developers my applause in achieving a design past prototype and able to return reportable test results with FAA cert, it has a lot of merit...However...there is always a "but"... in reviewing the engine, and which their previous promotions didn't allude to, was the archillies heal of cam engines...the loading on the main bearings bare the forces of combustion with bmep of 11 or so bar, that typically translates to a factor of 10 for peak pressures...and on an 83mm piston/bore which the dynacam run translates to well over 30tons of force...add to that the free nature of the bearing and postive feed oil delivery...the Dynacam engine centrifuged oil misted from the central driveshaft.

But the big problem to resolve which I believe held up its release to the market...the reciprocating assembly is somewhat bulky and heavy. compared to conventional assemblies. Being a 4-stroke, the reciprocating mass g forces at the top of the induction stroke @ 2000rpm & 95mm stroke is 210g's, overrun stresses being continuous, would be significant towards longevity with no combustion forces to counter them...I would say bearing life would be very short indeed for the size of bearings the design used and the Cam profile to fit within the engines case dimensions.

It would seem in their haste to get an investor on board to manufacture the engine the DynaCam peoples lawyer did a really messy job in their contract with the Axial Vector people and unwittingly gave them "exclusive" rights to the whole business...business politics...shame! All they had to do was make it!! The concept has a lot of development potential presently with ceramic bearings, carbon pistons etc, synthetic oils and design CAD technology.

AirDOGGe
07-30-2012, 09:41 PM
Thank you for that very informative post.

There's a reason the good ol' reciprocating internal combustion engine survives today....it WORKS. Many decades of improvements make it a tough horse to beat.

Willi7777
10-11-2012, 09:31 AM
The "engine", project has been resurrected. It is to be renamed which was one of the things lost in the lawsuit. This engine has had cooling problems in the past, 15 generations ago, but the oil cooler size was increased and it solved the problem. This engine has an FAA certified 2000 hour tbo. If it had problems of cooling and bearing friction it would have never been FAA certified.
The real problem for this project was the engineers who currently have the plans. They are not business men and got into business with a company and partner who specialize in raising funds for a project and then taking the money and running. This wasn't the first project this gentleman has bilked investors on.
This motor has been a product of bad timing and poor business practice. Hopefully with a slow and more prudent complete process this project will finally get off the ground.