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View Full Version : Boeing Stratoliner Down In Seattle



AAFO_WSagar
03-28-2002, 02:21 PM
**Note: I moved this message over here, even though not racing related, this seems more appropriate here than where I originally put it***

Bummer!

Nobody hurt badly, aircraft reasonably intact. Thanks to one of the board members for the tip, we just tuned into Seattle TV website and got this

http://sns.kcpq.com/kcpq-032802planedown.story

http://www.seattleinsider.com/partners/kirotv/news/2002/03/plane_photo.html

http://www.komotv.com/stories/17560.htm

http://www.king5.com/topstories/NW_032802WABvintageplane.1dcfd60f.html

http://www.aafo.com/news/events/oshkosh-2001/g-3/images/03.jpg

http://www.nwcn.com/topstory/NW_032802WABvintageplane.1dcfd60f.html

Wayne

AAFO_WSagar
03-28-2002, 05:27 PM
This airplane was/is absolutely beautiful! The level of the restoration was immaculate, of particular note to this polished metal fan was the gorgeous finish on this airplane. One can only hope that they will be able to tow it up the very convenient boat ramp just aft of the tail and will be able to get under it and somehow lower the gear first. Truly a miracle that there is so little visible damage and that no one was seroiously injured! Wonderful peice of history, would have been a terrible shame to lose it.

http://www.aafo.com/news/events/oshkosh-2001/g-5/images/02.jpg

Wayne
PS.. we have several more shots of this airplane that we've been trying to get ready for display and will try to do so asap.

ShermB
03-28-2002, 09:43 PM
My source said three runaway props.No power on R wing, only one engine on L wing. Boeing volunteers worked six plus years to restore it and get it ready to go to the Smithsonian. Pretty sad in Seattle tonight.

AAFO_WSagar
03-29-2002, 11:51 PM
Originally posted by ShermB
My source said three runaway props.No power on R wing, only one engine on L wing. Boeing volunteers worked six plus years to restore it and get it ready to go to the Smithsonian. Pretty sad in Seattle tonight. Clicking on the links above, there is now amateur video of the landing, the pilot did a masterful job of getting it down in one piece.

One does have to wonder about the fuel remaing on board, however. I remember a similar incident several years ago when I lived in PDX where a DC-8 had a landing gear light showing or not showing. They flew around messing with it till one after the other, the engines quit on them.

I really hate to say it, and I don't mean it in any way to cast any shadow on the pilot, who did a great job of getting her down and doubtless, fuel management was somebody else's "job" on the flight.. (though we all know it finally rests on PIC)

But if someone wanted to bet me a $20 spot right now on how much fuel was left on that airplane, I'd say... "not enough"...

Wayne

leo
03-30-2002, 05:11 PM
Even tho it sounds like it, I sure hope it was'nt fuel mismanagement. One of the thre worthless Quantities. Altitude above, Runway behind and air in the tanks. Wonderful job getting her down in one piece and with all souls aboard safe.

AAFO_WSagar
03-30-2002, 05:40 PM
Originally posted by leo
Even tho it sounds like it, I sure hope it was'nt fuel mismanagement. One of the thre worthless Quantities. Altitude above, Runway behind and air in the tanks. Wonderful job getting her down in one piece and with all souls aboard safe. Yep it was indeed.. The captain of the DC-8 that landed "short" at PDX also did a masterful job landing the airplane in suburban east Portland and the cockpit transcript had him query the FE several times during the manuevering while they were trying to sort out the gear indication problem.. all that considered, the FAA still frowns on any captiain when an airplane lands short, short of fuel.

It'll be a bummer for the pilot if so. It is a miracle that it came out as good as it did though.

Wayne

ShermB
03-30-2002, 09:45 PM
:) Today's paper shows her out of the water and being loaded for transport. They will assess the salt water damage and make their determinations for repair/restoration. Pilot quoted as having difficulty with one engine after ahooting a touch and go, so headed back. Rest of the engines then went before he could make the field. One of the pax was the guy that headed up the original restoration work project.

AAFO_WSagar
03-31-2002, 04:32 PM
Originally posted by ShermB
:) Today's paper shows her out of the water and being loaded for transport. They will assess the salt water damage and make their determinations for repair/restoration. Pilot quoted as having difficulty with one engine after ahooting a touch and go, so headed back. Rest of the engines then went before he could make the field. One of the pax was the guy that headed up the original restoration work project. Could have been worse to be sure! But a lot of work ahead of them and I read in one article where the Smithsonian was not sure they would return it to flight status.. I suspect a disassembly and overland trip to her final resting place will be what happens.. Or more likely, a long barge trip.

Link to Seattle PI story http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/64667_plane30.shtml

Wayne

bearfan1
03-31-2002, 05:33 PM
http://www.bobqat.com/AeroBob/307/Recovery.html

Duane

AAFO_WSagar
03-31-2002, 05:43 PM
Originally posted by bearfan1
http://www.bobqat.com/AeroBob/307/Recovery.html

Duane Very cool.. good link Duane! Does not look too good but could sure have been worse!

She sure looked better at Oshkosh!

Wayne

W J Pearce
04-04-2002, 07:28 PM
Preliminary NTSB report is in. Looks like fuel starvation.

NTSB 307 link (http://www.ntsb.gov/NTSB/brief.asp?ev_id=20020401X00435&key=1)

AAFO_WSagar
04-04-2002, 07:37 PM
Originally posted by W J Pearce
Preliminary NTSB report is in. Looks like fuel starvation.

NTSB 307 link (http://www.ntsb.gov/NTSB/brief.asp?ev_id=20020401X00435&key=1) Pretty clear that the engines were not gettin any gas, I guess the big question would then be, was there any gas?

Wayne

W J Pearce
04-04-2002, 07:42 PM
I sure hope there was fuel in the tanks. I would hate to see this being pilot error. It does seem like he had his hands full at the time. I just hate to see it.

Bill Pearce

AAFO_WSagar
04-04-2002, 09:12 PM
Originally posted by W J Pearce
I sure hope there was fuel in the tanks. I would hate to see this being pilot error. It does seem like he had his hands full at the time. I just hate to see it.

Bill Pearce I do too, guy does that good of a job getting an airplane down with nobody hurt and the plane in better shape than could ever be expected deserves a medal, hopefully it works out that way for him.

Wayne

A B17 guy
04-09-2002, 10:42 AM
Knowing the kind of people involved, both pilots are Boeing test pilots, I am sure that amount of fuel aboard was not the problem.
In a disscussion with an individual closely involved in the recovery effort, although he was restricted in what he could say because of the ongoing investigation, he did say that during recovery while were pumping water out to lighten it, they pumped water and Fuel out of the tanks. He did not say how much.
No. 4 engine was running when it hit the water, and suffered the most. Including a broken engine mount. The landing gear broke off and damaged the airframe.
The main effort now is to prevent salt damage by fresh water rinsing, including a chemical to neutralise the salt, and disassemble components and put them in fresh water baths.
The aircraft is repairable, the question is $$$, and if it will ever be allowed to fly again.