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View Full Version : Lens Hoods and Filters



p51flyby42
02-07-2007, 11:28 AM
I was wondering how often you guys use lens hoods? In what conditions? On what subjects?

Also, I have always used lens "filters" as one way to help protect my lenses. They have all been clear, unless I was trying to create some affect. Plus, I had a filter systems that allowed me to mount them in addition to the clear filter. That was with my film SLR. Now that I have a digital SLR, I need to purchase some new filters for the new lenses. What do you recommend? UV? Polarized? Clear? Other?

Thanks for your help/input.

:1zhelp: :dunno:

jarrodeu
02-07-2007, 02:13 PM
I use Heliopan UV filters. Maybe some day I will get a SH-PMC (multi-coated) UV filter.

Jarrod

T. Adams
02-07-2007, 03:08 PM
Hoods, all the time, filters, never. Unless you are shooting in a harsh environment that can harm the lense, it is a waste to put a cheap piece of glass on the front of a lense that cost thousands. As has been pointed out before, once you move up to the big glass, 300 f/2.8, 400 f/2.8, 500 and 600 f/4, they don't make filters to cover the front element of the lense, they are too big.

p51flyby42
02-07-2007, 04:51 PM
thanks for (both of) your replies.

yah, i agree that putting stuff on one's lens is not optimal. i was just wondering if people did it for protection (sounds funny) and/or on "problem" days - overcast/cloudy, odd lighting, etc. i have a 17-55 f/2.8 lens that will fit a 77mm filter (the biggest i see listed!). they do go all the way up to about 1/5 the cost of the lens. but i see them for $30, too...

anyway, for airshow photography, it seems like it's always either overcast or the sun is behind show center... :rolleyes: just seeing if anyone does anything about it besides in post-production... :type:

cb



Hoods, all the time, filters, never. Unless you are shooting in a harsh environment that can harm the lense, it is a waste to put a cheap piece of glass on the front of a lense that cost thousands. As has been pointed out before, once you move up to the big glass, 300 f/2.8, 400 f/2.8, 500 and 600 f/4, they don't make filters to cover the front element of the lense, they are too big.

jarrodeu
02-07-2007, 07:59 PM
Hoods, all the time, filters, never. Unless you are shooting in a harsh environment that can harm the lense, it is a waste to put a cheap piece of glass on the front of a lense that cost thousands. As has been pointed out before, once you move up to the big glass, 300 f/2.8, 400 f/2.8, 500 and 600 f/4, they don't make filters to cover the front element of the lense, they are too big.
Don't those nice lenses come with their own replaceable protective glass?
It may slightly degrade image quality but I feel much better knowing if something were to happen, it would happen to my $50 filter rather than my nice lens I spent so much money on.

T. Adams
02-07-2007, 08:11 PM
You can get the front element replaced on the big 2.8 prime lenses, but you can't cover the glass with anything, they are too big. They have a slot for drop in filters near the base of the lense.

Stevo
02-07-2007, 08:49 PM
Now where did that thread go :confused: ... AH, here it is --> http://www.aafo.com/hangartalk/showthread.php?t=3323

p51flyby42
02-07-2007, 11:26 PM
clear as mud! :eek5: guess it will just come down to experimentation...

a couple things from that thread, though:
1) i really AM a rookie... it's great to hear from the pros
2) i think i missed some fun at last years races (gathering of photographers) :beerchug:


Now where did that thread go :confused: ... AH, here it is --> http://www.aafo.com/hangartalk/showthread.php?t=3323

thanks to everyone for your advice. who knows what i'll have by reno... :rolleyes: hopefully a second lens that will make the point mute as stated before (optics too big)! :thumbsup:

p

AAFO_WSagar
02-09-2007, 02:13 AM
I'm with Tim on this. I used to "protect" my glass investments with as cheap a filter as I could.. then I noticed the degredation of the images you get when you use them.

If you're careful, keep your hood on and don't get crazy. Why buy the best glass you can and then "filter" it with a $50. piece of glass?

I actually made the decision not to use filters when I bought my 80-400vr second hand. The filter that came with it had a scratch.. so I took it off and have been shooting (somewhat) happily ever after..

Is it bedtime yet??

:dunno:

Next one's for you Steve, then it's bedtime!